Oxford Centre for Computational Neuroscience

Professor Edmund T. Rolls

Theories of brain function and behaviour


Cerebral Cortex



The Noisy Brain


Emotion Explained


Memory, Attention, and Decision-Making


Neuroculture

Neural Networks and Brain Function

All these theories are closely linked to the discoveries made in the neuronal recording, functional neuroimaging, and patient investigation studies. 


Principles of Operation of the Cerebral Cortex (B12).

 

A theory of emotion, and pleasure, and reward; and the principles of their implementation in the brain (B5, B11, 273, 520, 148, 364, 428, 509, 526, 533, 534, 552).


A theory of motivation (557).


The roles of the emotional and the reasoning systems in decision-making (497, 518, B5, B10, B11).

 

A biased activation theory of top-down attentional and cognitive control (339, 488, 520, 530, B11, B12).

 

A theory and model of hippocampal operation and episodic memory (111, 125, 136, 163, 186, 200, 205, 258, 266, 268, 300, 306, 307, 309, 345, 370, 403, 411, 415, 433, 453, 479, 521, 527, 529, 539, 545, 550, B12).

A theory of the art of memory (571).

 

A theory and model of invariant visual object recognition in the ventral visual system (162, 179, 192, 226, 245, 275, 277, 280, 283, 290, 304, 312, 396, 406, 414, 446, 455, 473, 485, 516, 535, 536, 554, B12).

 

A theory of invariant global motion recognition in the dorsal visual system (413).

 

A theory of the utility of the stochastic dynamics of networks in the brain for decision-making and many other aspects of our behaviour, including creativity (404, 463, 477, 483, 491, 500, 502, 504, 507, 513, 518, 540, B9, B11, B12). The stochastic dynamics arises from the almost random (Poisson) firing times of cortical neurons for a given mean firing rate, and gives rise to the concept of The Noisy Brain (B9).

 

Theories of how alterations in the stability of cortical attractor networks can account for the symptoms of schizophrenia, of obsessive compulsive disorder, of depression, and of normal aging. The theories (431, 436, 449, 450, 490, 503, 540, 559, B12) have implications for treatment, and are complemented by neuroimaging investigations (538, 541, 563, 564, 565).


A non-reward attractor theory of depression (559, 572), supported by altered functional connectivity of the orbitofrontal cortex in depression (564), and a model of non-reward computation in the orbitofrontal cortex (562).

 

The roles of cortical attractor networks in short-term memory and top-down attention (294, 295, B6, 347, 360, 372, 379, 391, 410, 520, B8, 523, 530, B12).

 

The design of neural networks in the cortex by genetic evolution (284, B12).

 

A higher order syntactic thought (HOST) approach to consciousness (239, 341, 355, 398, 422, 432, 456, 493, 497, 525, B11, B12).

Separate limbic systems for emotion and memory, but no single limbic system (531).

The representation of information in the brain (172, 196, 204, 225, 227, 321, 255, 419, 474, 508, 231, 265, 329, 348, 351, 369, 517, 193, 197, 257, 407, 553, 561, B12).


The computational utility of diluted connectivity in attractor, pattern association, and competitive networks in the cerebral cortex (504, 515, 545, 550, B12).


The implementation of syntax in the brain (537).


Biological underpinnings of art and aesthetics (B10, 492, 509, 532, 556, 574).